© S M Jones Content is free for most uses - see legal stuff. Last update 28 Apr 2020
Steve and Pauline Jones’ Family History
We are not makers of history. We are made by history.Martin Luther King Jr.
Henry Witpen (1829-1846) served aboard the barque “Duilius” of Dartmouth
Built in 1840, the 308 ton barque “Duilius” was wrecked on 5/4/1853 in Guichen Bay, east of Robe township, off the south east coast of South Australia (Lat. -37.148683; Long. 139.778037). Whilst loading a cargo of wool, the ship was driven ashore in a north westerly gale, lost its cable and anchors and struck rocks. The captain at the time was W. Maxton. The Australian National Shipwreck Database reports on the site’s current environment as follows: “The site is badly deteriorated. It comprises of some timber remains (possibly the keelson) and some frames and planking (with sheathing). Copper bolts, iron knees, an iron hatch are spread out on the site. It is some integrity in that it points in a 330-150 degree orientation and you can follow material along this axis. Visibility is generally bad to get a good appreciation of the whole site. The main feature is a large pile of ballast 1-2 metres high, 10 metres in length by 5m wide. There could be some chain and possibly an anchor lying within it and next to it.”
Steve & Pauline Jones’ Family History
We are not makers of history. We are made by history.Martin Luther King Jr.
© S M Jones Content is free for most uses - see legal stuff. Last update 28 Apr 2020
Henry Witpen (1829-1846) served aboard the barque “Duilius” of Dartmouth
Built in 1840, the 308 ton barque “Duilius” was wrecked on 5/4/1853 in Guichen Bay, east of Robe township, off the south east coast of South Australia (Lat. -37.148683; Long. 139.778037). Whilst loading a cargo of wool, the ship was driven ashore in a north westerly gale, lost its cable and anchors and struck rocks. The captain at the time was W. Maxton. The Australian National Shipwreck Database reports on the site’s current environment as follows: “The site is badly deteriorated. It comprises of some timber remains (possibly the keelson) and some frames and planking (with sheathing). Copper bolts, iron knees, an iron hatch are spread out on the site. It is some integrity in that it points in a 330-150 degree orientation and you can follow material along this axis. Visibility is generally bad to get a good appreciation of the whole site. The main feature is a large pile of ballast 1-2 metres high, 10 metres in length by 5m wide. There could be some chain and possibly an anchor lying within it and next to it.”